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Rare diseases are not uncommon, and may be the mother lode for the world’s pharmaceutical producers and researchers

Rare diseases may individually affect a relatively small number of patients compared to common ailments but the overall burden on society is heavy and drug developers should not ignore its market potential, says policy advocate.“Rare diseases are not that rare when one considers the fact that each patient’s disease also has a big impact on each of their family members and carers,” said Li Linkang, executive director of China Alliance for Rare Disease. “Medical experts have made a conservative… Source link

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A Xi’an girl’s escape from early death sheds light on China’s arduous journey to make drugs affordable for rare diseases

When Gu Ruofei was four and half years old, teachers at her school in Shaanxi province reported that she had trouble jumping during her dance class.As her motor skills deteriorated, doctors in the provincial capital of Xi’an suspected the toddler may be afflicted by a metabolic disorder that stunted her growth. Blood tests in Beijing confirmed in 2004 that Gu had mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS), a progressively debilitating disease caused by the absence of an enzyme. Undetectable at birth, symptoms… Source link

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IBM works on AI to detect chronic diseases like Parkinson's, diabetes

IBM is banking on artificial intelligence (AI) and connected devices to find new ways to help people stay healthy, as the world copes with an ageing population and prevalent chronic diseases.The New York-based technology company is working with research partners on various connected devices, including sensors attached to the floor, chair or bed of patients, to help detect diseases at an early stage, according to Norishige Morimoto, vice-president for research and development at IBM Japan… Source link

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Along with climate change come mosquito-borne diseases. Is Hong Kong ready for a public health emergency?

Months after Hong Kong was ranked by Bloomberg as the economy with the world’s most efficient health care, its public health system is caught in a crisis. More than 100 medical staff protested about the manpower crunch and ward overcrowding amid a winter flu surge in January, with many holding placards that sent the desperate message: “Breaking point”. This has been followed by a spike in measles infections since mid-March, and a shortage of vaccines. More alarmingly, the next public health… Source link

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